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Girls’ Education South Sudan (GESS), with Knowledge Evidence and Research (KER) component

CGA led the Knowledge Evidence and Research (KER), Cash Transfer, Capitation Grants and South Sudan Schools' Attendance Monitoring System component of the GESS programme. Using qualitative and quantitative research methods, KER aimed to generate knowledge about best practices in girls’ education, to develop an evidence base for the impact of project interventions, and to learn about the successes and failures in design, to protect against doing harm and to monitor value for money.

Country/Region: Global
Dates/Duration: 2013 - 2018
Funded by: DFID
Clients: Ministry of General Education and Instruction, BMB Mott MacDonald

Girls' Education South Sudan 1 (GESS 1) was a six-and-a-half-year programme, contracted on a “Design and Build” basis to promote enrolment, attendance, and retention at school. Funded by DFID, working with Ministry of General Education and Instruction, Government of the Republic of South Sudan, it aimed to have a nationally transformative impact – and it did: in the seven years from the start of series implementation, total enrolment tripled, and girls’ enrolment quadrupled.

CGA, as the South Sudan education experts on the consortium, played the principal role in the design of the whole programme, working to co-create, with MoGEI and DFID:

The programme had three overarching outputs:

- Social and Behavioural Change,
- Whole-School Improvement (including Cash Transfers to girls and their families, School Grants, and teaching quality interventions),
- and Knowledge, Evidence and Research

Using qualitative and quantitative research methods, KER aimed to generate knowledge about best practices in girls’ education, to develop an evidence base for the impact of project interventions, and to learn about the successes and failures in design, to protect against doing harm and to monitor value for money.

CGA also led the Cash Transfer, Capitation Grants and South Sudan Schools' Attendance Monitoring System component of the GESS programme.

CGA was the technical lead on the GESS Knowledge, Evidence and Research Component, and delivered comprehensive national Baseline, Midline, and End line research, which exceeded the GESS1 log frame requirements. CGA extended coverage to areas with challenging operational and security contexts. CGA led on dissemination, including the 2014 New York Millennium Development Goals Countdown presentation, presentation to HMG Cabinet Secretary in 2015, and, led a presentation and essay in co-authored volume for the Cash Learning Partnership on Cash Transfers’ impact.

CGA implemented three rounds of data collection, at baseline, midline and endline reports, including school and household surveys, surveys of subnational education capacity, and longitudinal qualitative surveys, producing comprehensive reports. CGA supported the establishment of national systems for the distribution of Cash Transfers to girls, and Capitation Grants for schools, including remote accountability mechanisms.

Between 2014-2018, over 500,000 cash transfers were made to 284,601 girls across all of the 10 former states of the Republic of South Sudan. CGA built SSSAMS.org, a web-based, real-time reporting system for individuals and project monitoring, still used by government and partners to track activities and milestones, since 2014. Independent research has demonstrated the impact of Cash Transfers on girls' enrolment. CGA's work on Capitation Grants to schools leveraged the Government of South Sudan to commit its own budget to Capitation Grants for primary schools.

Our pupil attendance monitoring system and education finance system SSSAMS is still used by the government and partners to track activities and milestones. They supported the delivery of 590,000 school grants, cash transfers and teacher incentives, which helped triple school enrolment from 928,000 in 2014 in just over 3000 schools to 2.7m in 2020, in over 5000 schools. As part of this, girls enrolment increased from <39% to >45%.

Output

Baseline, midline and endline reports on:
Payam and County Education surveys; Education PFM survey; Household Surveys; School Surveys; Education Capitation Grant Policy; School Management Committee Manual on CG accountability system; discussion paper on “straight through transfers to Public Service Units” Longitudinal Studies on effect of CT and Capitation Grants

OR
Between 2014-2018, over 500,000 cash transfers were made to 284,601 girls across all of the 10 former states of the Republic of South Sudan. CGA built SSSAMS.org, a web-based, real-time reporting system for individuals and project monitoring, still used by government and partners to track activities and milestones, since 2014.

Following the completion of GESS, DFID committed to 2 million more transfers to an estimated 600,000 unique recipients 2019-2023.

CGA contributed to the introduction of Mobile Money to South Sudan.

Through the KER component, we delivered comprehensive national Baseline, Midline, and Endline research, which exceeded the GESS1 logframe requirements.

OR
One-off complex uploads may be more effectively done by a database administrator, but regular imports are routinely automated: using a mapping of fields in the data dictionary to the fields in the imported data set. For www.sssams.org a range of data imports (behind login) and exports (see bottom right of front page) are handled.

OR
- System available offline
- Data collection tool / Beneficiary registration
- Custom dashboards and reporting
- GDPR compliant
- Suitable for use with partners and in consortia
- Capable of integration with other systems
- Experience with transfer modalities
- Scalable for use in multiple countries and contexts
- Built in donor audit readiness

OR
CTs:
- Data collection tool / Beneficiary registration
- Experience with transfer modalities
- Capable of integration with other systems

Outputs and Resources

  • Breaking barriers to girls' education by breaking cycles of poverty - Cash Transfers in South Sudan: a case study

    The cash transfer component of the Girls’ Education South Sudan (GESS) programme was implemented in the Republic of South Sudan (RSS) at a time of high insecurity and economic collapse. It was implemented in a context where social and cultural norms and economic constraints mutually reinforce to reduce the priority given to girls’ education by poor families. It provided CTs of a relatively low value compared to those provided in other relevantly similar programmes. Despite the low values, research suggests that the cash transfers contributed to an increase in the proportion of girls enrolled in school from less than 40 percent in 2014 to 44.4 percent in 2017.3 This increase occurred in the context of a 63 percent overall increase in reported enrolment between 2014 and 2017. This paper considers three possible explanations for the impact of the GESS CT programming.

    See the full report